An exclusive look into AirBnB’s NYC rental data.

betanyc:

image

If you’ve been following the discussion around AirBnB, many see it as a platform for illegal hotels. Absent from the conversation has been raw data around who is sharing their home, apartment, or who is acting as a broker for a number of units. Here is your opportunity to draw your own conclusion. 

Check out InsideAirBnB.com for exclusive access to NYC’s AirBnB rental activity. Don’t forget to download the data.

Today, we launch www.citygram.nyc — subscribe to NYC #OpenData subjects & locations.

Today, we launch www.citygram.nyc — subscribe to NYC #OpenData subjects & locations.

Pretty illustrations aside, this logo is representative of New York in more ways than one: In its adherence to the grid it reflects that of the city (if you can count, you can find your way around here); in its bulkiness it’s allusive to the power of New York as a center of culture, arts, politics and sports; in its shoulder-to-shoulder tightness it is a painful reminder of how little space there is here, but how much we enjoy and thrive in our proximity to each other; and in its openness, where anything can be framed or drawn inside it, it evokes the ability that everyone here has to make their own story, in their own way.

there is a conflicting process at work; as North Brooklyn is planned now, over the next decade, the actual amount of mixed-use commercial space will dramatically decrease. As the demand for above street level non-retail commercial space goes up, new development in our area will be predominantly residential without any mixed-use space for the new creative economy. And instead of continuing to develop as a vibrant cultural and economic engine, the new North Brooklyn will effectively become an inner ring suburb [and be economically consumptive rather than generative].